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Happy Mid-Autumn Festival!

Wish you a perfect life just like the roundest moon

Today is the most important traditional Chinese festivals, the Mid-Autumn Festival. I want to make a toast. I Wish that the round moon take my best blessing to you and your family. May you have a happy family, a bright future and a perfect life just like the roundest moon in Mid-Autumn Day!

What is Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival

The most important traditional Chinese festivals, the Mid-Autumn Festival is celebrated during the 15th day of the eighth month of the Chinese Lunar Calendar. This year it falls on Oct 4.

It takes its name from the fact that it is always celebrated in the middle of the autumn season.

The day is also known as the Moon Festival, as at that time of the year the moon is at its roundest and brightest. This day is also considered a harvest festival since fruit, vegetables, and grain have been harvested by this time.

It is an evening celebration where families gather together to light lanterns, eat moon cakes and appreciate the round moon. The full moon is a symbol for the family reunion, which is why that day is also known as the Festival of Reunion.

What we will do in Mid-Autumn Festival

It is an evening celebration where families gather together to light lanterns, eat moon cakes and appreciate the round moon. The full moon is a symbol for the family reunion, which is why that day is also known as the Festival of Reunion.

It's almost the time of year when many people of Chinese origin will be tucking into mooncakes and preparing for family gatherings.

What is mooncake

For much Chinese, the moon symbolizes prosperity, peace, and reunion and it wouldn't be Mid-Autumn Festival without mooncakes - a type of pastry with different fillings - which are often given as gifts.

Mooncakes are believed to have originated from Yuan dynasty (1271–1368) revolutionaries, who are said to have used the pastries to pass secret messages between each other.

They are commonly filled with lotus seed paste with an egg yolk in the middle. Others contain ingredients such as sesame seed or red bean paste. Over the years these treats, which are also known for their high calorie and fat content, have changed to suit modern taste buds, with ice cream mochi-style cakes and chocolate molten lava mooncakes.

Some bakeries in Hong Kong have created unusual combinations to give their cakes a contemporary twist, such as truffle and egg mooncakes mixed into white lotus seed paste. Other creations include lychee, jasmine, earl grey flavored egg custard mooncakes.

Another essential feature of the celebrations is lanterns - either decorative or hand-held. Other traditions include lantern carnivals and fire dragon dances, while thousands of moon-gazers gather in parks across China for a chance to see the moon at its brightest.

The Origins and History of China’s Mid-Autumn Festival

The Mid-Autumn Festival celebrations date back more than 2,000 years. The word "Mid-Autumn" first appeared in the famous ancient book Zhou Li (The Zhou Rituals, a book telling the rituals in the Zhou Dynasty). However, it was not until the early Tang Dynasty (618-907) that the day was officially celebrated as a traditional festival. It became an established festival during the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and has become as popular as the Spring Festival since the Ming and Qing dynasties (1368-1911). Celebrations have continued ever since and more customs for marking this occasion have been formed.

In feudal times, Chinese emperors prayed to Heaven for a prosperous year. They chose the morning of the 15th day of the second lunar month to worship the sun and the night of the 15th day of the eighth lunar month to hold a ceremony in praise of the moon. In the Xicheng district of Beijing is the Yuetan Park, which originally was the Temple of Moon, and every year the emperor would go there to offer a sacrifice to the moon.

The most famous Mid-Autumn Festival story is Chang Er flying to the moon.

The story goes like this…

Long, long ago, there were ten suns in the sky. The suns burnt all the plants and people were dying on Earth until one-day excellent archer Hou Yi used his bow and arrows to shoot down nine of the suns. Earth was saved, and people flocked to learn archery from Hou Yi.

The Western Queen Mother gave Hou Yi a bottle of elixir that could make one person immortal. Although Hou Yi did want to become immortal, he wanted to stay with his wife Chang Er more. Therefore, he just kept it at home.

Pang Meng, one of his students, tried to seize the elixir when Hou Yi wasn’t at home. Faced with greedy Pang Meng, Chang Er decided to drink the elixir. It made her fly to the moon where she would stay forever.

To remember her and pray for her, Hou Yi and others started to worship the moon with many offerings. Chang Er image usually appears on Mid-Autumn Festival pictures. Children in China are told that Change Er is still living on the moon. And on the night of the Mid-Autumn Festival, when the moon is bright, children try their best to find the shape of Chang Er on the moon.

A bright moon and stars twinkle and shine. Wishing you a merry Mid-Autumn Festival, bliss, and happiness.

Good News About JCROBOT S3

We will start accepting the pre-order of JCROBOT S3(Plastic model) after the holiday.

The new model S3 will be released officially in HK Electronics Fair 2017 - Oct 18-21, Hong Kong‎

Welcome to meet us at Booth 112T22.

in HK Electronics Fair 2017 - Oct 18-21, Hong Kong

Any question or request, please feel free to contact us: [email protected]

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